Earth Matters.

Earth matters is a regular window into everything that drives us at PANGAIA. From the motivation behind our latest material capsules and the impact that our innovations can make, to what inspires our restlessness in designing a more Earth-positive future.

Grape shifting.

To both tackle the environmental challenges linked to excess waste in the agricultural industry and to diversify our material mix, we’re using innovative processes to transform waste into something brand new.

Our Grape Leather Sneakers (which dropped this week in fresh new shades), are a prime example of repurposed innovation. By utilizing the grape skin, pulp and stems leftover from the winemaking industry, we can help to create a more circular system and make good—and wearable—use of waste material.

Each year, the global wine industry produces 26 billion liters of wine. Usually, this produces 6.5 billion liters of waste. But, if fully utilized, it could produce 2.6 billion square meters of grape leather. Combined with a part-recycled rubber sole created from industrial waste and organic cotton laces (with 100% recycled plastic tips), our classic sneakers are proof of the wonder we can create with waste materials.

Earth Matters.

Earth matters is a regular window into everything that drives us at PANGAIA. From the motivation behind our latest material capsules and the impact that our innovations can make, to what inspires our restlessness in designing a more Earth-positive future.

Grape shifting.

To both tackle the environmental challenges linked to excess waste in the agricultural industry and to diversify our material mix, we’re using innovative processes to transform waste into something brand new.

Our Grape Leather Sneakers (which dropped this week in fresh new shades), are a prime example of repurposed innovation. By utilizing the grape skin, pulp and stems leftover from the winemaking industry, we can help to create a more circular system and make good—and wearable—use of waste material.

Each year, the global wine industry produces 26 billion liters of wine. Usually, this produces 6.5 billion liters of waste. But, if fully utilized, it could produce 2.6 billion square meters of grape leather. Combined with a part-recycled rubber sole created from industrial waste and organic cotton laces (with 100% recycled plastic tips), our classic sneakers are proof of the wonder we can create with waste materials.

Let's break it down.

Today is National Compost Day—a reminder of the importance of composting for the planet. Did you know conventional plastic can take up to 1000 years to break down? That's why at PANGAIA, our products are packaged in TIPA®, a compostable plastic alternative.

TIPA® is a fully compostable plastic packaging that decomposes the same way organic matter decomposes. When placed in a compost environment with proper temperature, humidity, and oxygen, TIPA® packaging is decomposed into small pieces that are capable of being broken down and ingested by microorganisms to produce nutrient-rich soil.

To create your own compost heap at home, you’ll need a sunny spot in your backyard and an equal mix of green, nitrogen-rich materials (like grass cuttings or vegetable peel) and brown, carbon-rich matter (like cardboard, paper towels or woody stems). It can take a few months for the compost process to complete, but you can speed up the process by regularly turning and aerating your compost material.

*This image is for demonstration purposes only. How your compost will look may vary.

Let’s break it down.

Today is National Compost Day—a reminder of the importance of composting for the planet. Did you know conventional plastic can take up to 1000 years to break down? That's why at PANGAIA, our products are packaged in TIPA®, a compostable plastic alternative.

TIPA® is a fully compostable plastic packaging that decomposes the same way organic matter decomposes. When placed in a compost environment with proper temperature, humidity, and oxygen, TIPA® packaging is decomposed into small pieces that are capable of being broken down and ingested by microorganisms to produce nutrient-rich soil.

To create your own compost heap at home, you’ll need a sunny spot in your backyard and an equal mix of green, nitrogen-rich materials (like grass cuttings or vegetable peel) and brown, carbon-rich matter (like cardboard, paper towels or woody stems). It can take a few months for the compost process to complete, but you can speed up the process by regularly turning and aerating your compost material.

*This image is for demonstration purposes only. How your compost will look may vary.

Watch. Read. Listen.

PRIDE on Disney+

We’re kickstarting Pride month by rewatching 2021 docuseries PRIDE, a powerful six-part series chronicling the struggle for LGBTQ+ civil rights in America from the 1950s through the 2000s.

Jungle: How Tropical Forests Shaped the World - and Us by Patrick Roberts

Inspired by our Tropics Capsule which launched last week, we’re reading Jungle, which details the history of tropical forests. Starting with the arrival of land plants 500 million years ago, it explores the human connection with our planet’s forestsfrom cultivation to colonial exploitation.

The Climate Kitchen: Food Waste and Cooking With Scraps.

In the US, approximately 40% of all food we buy is never eaten. In this episode of The Climate Kitchen, host Zachary Azrael explores the scale of the food waste problem, its impact on the planet, and how both large-scale companies and us at home can be more resourceful with our leftovers.

Watch. Read. Listen.

PRIDE on Disney+

We’re kickstarting Pride month by rewatching 2021 docuseries PRIDE, a powerful six-part series chronicling the struggle for LGBTQ+ civil rights in America from the 1950s through the 2000s.

Jungle: How Tropical Forests Shaped the World - and Us by Patrick Roberts

Inspired by our Tropics Capsule which launched last week, we’re reading Jungle, which details the history of tropical forests. Starting with the arrival of land plants 500 million years ago, it explores the human connection with our planet’s forestsfrom cultivation to colonial exploitation.

The Climate Kitchen: Food Waste and Cooking With Scraps.

In the US, approximately 40% of all food we buy is never eaten. In this episode of The Climate Kitchen, host Zachary Azrael explores the scale of the food waste problem, its impact on the planet, and how both large-scale companies and us at home can be more resourceful with our leftovers.